CPT CODE 96116, 96118, 96119, 96120 -Neuropsychological testing

CPT CODE and Description

96116 - Neurobehavioral status exam (clinical assessment of thinking, reasoning and judgment, eg, acquired knowledge, attention, language, memory, planning and problem solving, and visual spatial abilities), per hour of the psychologist's or physician's time, both face-to-face time with the patient and time interpreting test results and preparing the report - Average fee amount - $75 - $110

96118 - Neuropsychological testing (eg, Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Battery, Wechsler Memory Scales and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test), per hour of the psychologist's or physician's time, both face-to-face time administering tests to the patient and time interpreting these test results and preparing the report

96119 - Neuropsychological testing (eg, Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Battery, Wechsler Memory Scales and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test), with qualified health care professional interpretation and report,

96120 - Neuropsychological testing (eg, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test), administered by a computer, with qualified health care professional interpretation and report


96116 Explained 

• “A neurobehavioral status exam is completed prior to the administration of neuropsychological testing. The status exam involves clinical assessment of the patient, collateral interviews (as appropriate and review of prior records. The interview would involved clinical assessment of several domains including but limited to; thinking, reasoning and judgment, e.g., acquired knowledge, attention, language, memory, planning and problem solving and visual spatial abilities. The clinical assessment would determine the types of tests and how those tests should be administered.”


Psychological Assessment

Psychological assessment is similar to psychological testing but usually involves a more comprehensive assessment of the individual. Psychological assessment is a process that involves the integration of information from multiple sources, such as tests of normal and abnormal personality, tests of ability or intelligence, tests of interests or attitudes, as well as information from personal interviews. Collateral information is also collected about personal, occupational, or medical history, such as from records or from interviews with parents, spouses, teachers, or previous therapists or physicians. A psychological test is one of the sources of data used within the process of assessment; usually more than one test is used. Many psychologists do some level of assessment when providing services to clients or patients, and may use for example, simple check lists to assess some traits or symptoms. Psychological assessment is a complex, detailed, in-depth process. Typical types of focus for psychological assessment provide a diagnosis for treatment settings; assess a particular area of functioning or disability often for school settings; help select type of treatment or assess treatment outcomes; help courts decide issues such as child custody or competency to stand trial; or to help assess job applicants or employees and provide career development counseling or training.

Indications and Limitations of Coverage and/or Medical Necessity

Psychological testing

CPT codes 96101, 96102, 96103, 96105, 96111
Psychological tests are used to assess a variety of mental abilities and attributes, including Central Nervous System (CNS) Assessments such as neuro-cognitive, mental status, achievement and ability, personality, and neurological functioning.

Psychological testing requires a clinically trained examiner. All psychological tests should be administered, scored, and interpreted by a trained professional such as a clinical psychologist, psychologist, advanced nurse practitioner with education in this area or a physician assistant who works with a psychiatrist with expertise in the appropriate area. The purpose of psychological testing includes the following:
To assist with diagnosis and management following clinical evaluation when a mental illness or psychological abnormality is suspected.

To provide a differential diagnosis from a range of neurological/psychological disorders that present with similar constellations of symptoms, e.g., differentiation between pseudodementia and depression.

To determine the clinical and functional significance of a brain abnormality.

To delineate the specific cognitive basis of functional complaints.

Neuropsychological Testing: 

CPT codes 96116, and 96118, 96119 and 96120

These evaluations are requested for patients with a history of psychological, neurologic or medical disorders known to impact cognitive or neurobehavioral functioning. The evaluations include a history of medical or neurological disorders compromising cognitive or behavioral functioning; congenital, genetic, or metabolic disorders known to be associated with impairments in cognitive or brain development; reported impairments in cognitive functioning; and evaluations of cognitive function as a part of the standard of care for treatment selection and treatment outcome evaluations.

Neuropsychological assessment is considered medically necessary for the following indications:

When there are mild or questionable deficits on standard mental status testing or clinical interview, and a neuropsychological assessment is needed to establish the presence of abnormalities or distinguish them from changes that may occur with normal aging, or the expected progression of other disease processes; or

When neuropsychological data can be combined with clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis in neurological or systemic conditions known to affect CNS functioning; or

When there is a need to quantify cognitive or behavioral deficits related to CNS impairment, especially when the information will be useful in determining a prognosis or informing treatment planning by determining the rate of disease progression; or

When there is a need for a pre-surgical or treatment-related cognitive evaluation to determine whether one might safely proceed with a medical or surgical procedure that may affect brain function (e.g., deep brain stimulation, resection of brain tumors or arteriovenous malformations, epilepsy surgery, stem cell transplant) or significantly alter a patient’s functional status; or

When there is a need to assess the potential impact of adverse effects of therapeutic substances that may cause cognitive impairment (e.g., radiation, chemotherapy, antiepileptic medications), especially when this information is utilized to determine treatment planning; or

When there is a need to monitor progression, recovery, and response to changing treatments, in patients with CNS disorders, in order to establish the most effective plan of care; or

When there is a need for objective measurement of the patient’s subjective complaints about memory, attention, or other cognitive dysfunction, which serves to determine treatment by differentiating psychogenic from neurogenic syndromes (e.g., dementia vs. depression); or

When there is a need to establish a treatment plan by determining functional abilities/impairments in individuals with known or suspected CNS disorders; or

When there is a need to determine whether a patient can comprehend and participate effectively in complex treatment regimens (e.g., surgeries to modify facial appearance, hearing, or tongue debulking in craniofacial or Down syndrome patients; transplant or bariatric surgeries in patients with diminished capacity), and to determine functional capacity for health care decision-making, work, independent living, managing financial affairs, etc.; or

When there is a need to design, administer, and/or monitor outcomes of cognitive rehabilitation procedures, such as compensatory memory training for brain-injured patients; or

When there is a need to establish treatment planning through identification and assessment of the neurocognitive sequelae of systemic disease (e.g., hepatic encephalopathy; anoxic/hypoxic injury associated with cardiac procedures); or

Assessment of neurocognitive functions for the formulation of rehabilitation and/or management strategies among individuals with neuropsychiatric disorders; or

When there is a need to diagnose cognitive or functional deficits in children and adolescents based on an inability to develop expected knowledge, skills or abilities as required to adapt to new or changing cognitive, social, emotional, or physical demands.

Examples of problems that might lead to neuropsychological testing include:
Detection of neurologic diseases based on quantitative assessment of neurocognitive abilities (e.g., mild head injury, anoxic injuries, AIDS dementia);

Differential diagnosis between psychogenic and neurogenic syndromes;

Delineation of the neurocognitive effects of CNS disorders;

Neurocognitive monitoring of recovery or progression of CNS disorders; and/or

Assessment of neurocognitive functions for the formulation of rehabilitation and/or management strategies among individuals with neuropsychiatric disorders.

Determining the management of the patient by confirmation or delineation of diagnosis.

Components of the Neuropsychological Evaluation
Record Review
The provider reviews the medical records and referral question, and determines whether an evaluation is appropriate.

Neuropsychological tests include direct question-and-answer, object manipulation, inspection and responses to pictures or patterns, paper-and-pencil written or multiple choice tests, which measure functional impairment and abilities in:
a. General intellect
b. Reasoning, sequencing, problem-solving, and executive function
c. Attention and concentration
d. Learning and memory
e. Language and communication
f. Visual-spatial cognition and visual-motor praxis
g. Motor and sensory function
h. Mood, conduct, personality, quality of life
i. Adaptive behavior (Activities of Daily Living)
j. Social-emotional awareness and responsivity
k. Psychopathology (e.g., psychotic thinking or somatization)
l. Motivation and effort (e.g., symptom validity testing)


Billing on the same day as an office visit: What Modifiers?

Modifiers 25, 59 and 52 are the most common modifiers used. The use and need of modifiers may vary so consultation with payers and carriers for definitive guidance on their policies is recommended. Carriers may determined that when psychological, neuropsychological or developmental testing and/or clinical and quality rating instrument coding is reported in conjunction with an assessment code e.g., 90791-90792 psychiatric evaluation exam, 96116 for neurobehavioral status exam or an E&M code, the time and effort to perform the testing itself is not counted toward the key components (history, physical exam and medical decisionmaking). Coding for the testing administration / interpretation and/or its integration into the overall patient evaluation are viewed by some payers as two separate and distinct services that are both above and beyond the office visit.

Medicare’s estimated reimbursement of the procedure codes, 96118-19, 96101-02 are based on 1 hr of testing. How should the time period spent in testing, interpreting and reporting the test results be factored into the billing?

The time component is not defined or addressed by Medicare so billing should be done in 1 hour increments. If testing, interpreting results, reporting, takes more than one-half hour, then one unit of the appropriate code should be billed. If testing, interpreting results, reporting takes more than one and one-half hour, then two units of the procedure code should be billed.

While the MCI Screen and Depression Screen are easily administered within minutes, the effort required to prepare for the patient’s visit and to counsel the patient should also be considered. Such considerations could include but are not limited to Physician time spent:

• Pulling a patient’s record (E&M)

• Familiarizing themselves with the clinical decision making process that led them to be tested (E&M)

• Meeting with the patient to remind them of the reason for the test and prepare them to be tested (E&M)

• Reviewing the results of the assessment, analyzing and interpreting the report (E&M)

• Developing a plan of care (Interpretation)

• Meeting with the patient, discussing the results and recommending a plan of care (E&M)


CPT Codes for Diagnostic Psychological and Neuropsychological Tests

The range of CPT codes used to report psychological and neuropsychological tests is 96101- 96120. CPT codes 96101, 96102, 96103, 96105, and 96111 are appropriate for use when billing for psychological tests. CPT codes 96116, 96118, 96119 and 96120 are appropriate for use when billing for neuropsychological tests.

All of the tests under this CPT code range 96101-96120 are indicated as active codes under the physician fee schedule database and are covered if medically necessary.



Coding Guidelines:

References to providers throughout this policy include non-physicians, such as clinical psychologists, independent psychologist, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and physician assistants when the services performed are within the scope of their clinical practice/education, licensed and authorized under the state law A minimum of 31 minutes must be provided to report any per hour code. Services 96101, 96116, 96118 and 96125 report time as (a) face–to-face with the patent and (b) time spent interpreting and preparing the report.

Typically, the neuropsychological evaluation requires 4-8 hours to perform, including administration, scoring, interpretation, report writing and interpretation to the patient and/or family. If the evaluation is performed over several days, the time should be combined and reported all on the last day of service .


CPT code equivalents of the most common components of the neuropsychological assessment include:

1. Direct clinical observation and interview with the patient, often with caregivers or significant others who serve as sources of information that the patient may be unable to provide (e.g., spouse, parent, adult child, care staff, therapists),
96116;

2. Review of medical records and, in some cases, other relevant records (e.g., work history, educational history, criminal or social services records, etc.), 96118;


Q: Can I perform psychological testing and psychotherapy on the same date of service?

A: No, the following therapy codes will be considered not separately reimbursed if provided on the same date of service as 96101, 96102, 96116, 96118, or 96119: 90804, 90805, 90806, 90807, 90808, 90809, 90810, 90811, 90812, 90813, 90814, 90815, 90823, 90824, 90826, 90827.

Reimbursement changes for CPT code 96116

Clinical evaluation of thinking and other mental functions is ingrained into every day medical practice. Assessment can be as simple as recognition by the practitioner that a long-standing patient seems unable to report details and grasp  the significance of a clinical situation or as complicated as an extensive battery of tests to sort out complex deficits. Several central nervous system assessment codes describe a middle ground. The examination is more detailed than a comprehensive evaluation and management examination, but less systematic and thorough than a comprehensive battery of
psychological or neuropsychological testing. Practices depend on the proper use of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT).

One of these codes is 96116- neurobehavioral status exam. It is defined in the CPT manual as ‘neurobehavioral status exam (clinical assessment of thinking, reasoning and judgment, eg, acquired knowledge, attention, language, memory, planning and problem solving, and visual spatial abilities), per hour of the psychologist’s or physician’s time, both face to face time with the member and time interpreting test results and preparing the report.’

We are implementing a new reimbursement policy that follows the CPT guidance restricting billable use of this code to psychologists and/or physicians. In addition, there will be a limit of 5 hours/units per year, to help ensure the code is being used consistently. Instances of services exceeding 5 hours/units per year are subject to review for case-specific detail This  February 2014 Connecticut 14 of 20 policy applies to all commercial Anthem health plans. (Please note that Medicaid and Medicare plans may have additional regulation and other guidance about utilization.)


96116 Testing &  Interpretation Neurobehavioral status exam (clinical assessment of thinking, reasoning and judgment, e.g., acquired knowledge, attention, language, memory, planning and problem Striving, and visual spatial abilities), per hour of the psychologist's or physician's time, both face-to-face time with the patient and time interpreting test results and preparing the report. $93

6. CPT code 96116 may be utilized by a neuropsychologist in lieu of 90791 to bill for an initial neuropsychological assessment visit, and may be utilized to bill for a 1 hour neurocognitive evaluation.

7. A psychologist who bills for services delivered by a psychometrist, psychometrician or CPA should use CPT code 96102 (for psychological testing) or 96119 (for neuropsychological testing).

8. A psychologist who bills for testing administered by computer should use CPT Code 96103 (psychological testing) or 96120 (for neuropsychological testing).

9. The Wada hemispheric activation test (CPT code 95958) is an open brain pre-surgical procedure when neuropsychological tests are administered along with EEG monitoring to determine the hemisphere of the brain responsible for cognitive functions such as speed and memory. The neuropsychological testing component is sometimes billed using the 65958 CPT code or may be billed using the 96118 neuropsychological testing CPT code. The neuropsychological testing component of the Wada test may be covered as a medical benefit.

96020 – Neurofunctional testing selection and administration during noninvasive imaging functional brain mapping, with test administered by a psychologist or physician, with review of test results and report. Note that CPT code 96020 should not be used in conjunction with 96101-96103, 96116, or 96120.


Neurobehavioral Status Exam

96116 – Neurobehavioral Status Exam: Clinical assessment of thinking, reasoning and judgment (e.g., acquired knowledge, attention, language, memory, planning and problem solving, and visual spatial abilities), per hour of psychologist's or physician's time, both
8 face-to-face time with the patient and time interpreting test results and preparing the report.


What modifiers are valid when billed with Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code 96116?

Effective January 1, 2008, the following modifiers are valid when billed with HCPCS code 96116:

• GT – Via interactive audio and video telecommunications system


ICD9 CODES*

437.9 (Cerebrovascular insufficiency)

780.93 (Memory loss)

294.8 (Dementia)

331.0 (Alzheimer's disease)

The ICD-9 codes above are listed as an example. The final determination of the ICD-9 code(s) must be the physician’s responsibility.

Some Medicare carriers have adopted Local Coverage Determination(s) (LCDs) which include a very specific list of ICD-9 Diagnosis Codes to be used for Psychiatry and Psychological services which include CPT Codes 96118, 96119. It is suggested that you check to see if your specific carrier has adopted such a policy before billing for these procedures.


CPT Codes for Diagnostic Psychological and Neuropsychological Tests

The range of CPT codes used to report psychological and neuropsychological tests is 96101- 96120. CPT codes 96101, 96102, 96103, 96105, and 96111 are appropriate for use when billing for psychological tests. CPT codes 96116, 96118, 96119 and 96120 are appropriate for use when billing for neuropsychological tests.

All of the tests under this CPT code range 96101-96120 are indicated as active codes under the physician fee schedule database and are covered if medically necessary.

Payment and Billing Guidelines for Psychological and Neuropsychological Tests The technician and computer CPT codes for psychological and neuropsychological tests include practice expense, malpractice expense and professional work relative value units. Accordingly, CPT psychological test code 96101 should not be paid when billed for the same tests or services performed under psychological test codes 96102 or 96103. CPT  europsychological test code 96118 should not be paid when billed for the same tests or services performed  nder neuropsychological test codes 96119 or 96120. However, CPT codes 96101 and 96118 can be paid separately on the rare occasion when billed on the same date of service for different and separate tests from 96102, 96103, 96119 and 96120.

Under the physician fee schedule, there is no payment for services performed by students or trainees. Accordingly, Medicare does not pay for services represented by CPT codes 96102 and 96119 when performed by a student or a trainee. However, the presence of a student or a trainee while the test is being administered does not prevent a physician, CP, IPP, NP, CNS
or PA from performing and being paid for the psychological test under 96102 or the neuropsychological test under 96119.http://www.cms.gov/manuals/Downloads/bp102c15.pdf Text:

Psychological and Neuropsychological Testing are diagnostic procedures that must be used as an important tool in making specific diagnoses or prognoses to aid in treatment planning and to address questions regarding treatment goals, efficacy, and patient disposition. Diagnostic procedures that have no impact on a patient’s plan of care or have no effect on treatment are not medically necessary. The CPT Codes discussed in this LCD and Billing and Coding Guidelines are used to report the services provided during testing of the cognitive function of the central nervous system. The testing of cognitive processes, visual motor responses and abstractive abilities is accomplished by the combination of several types of testing procedures.

Coding Guidelines: References to providers throughout this policy include non-physicians, such as clinical psychologists, independent psychologist, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and physician assistants when the services performed are within the scope of their clinical practice/education, licensed and authorized under the state law A minimum of 31 minutes must be provided to report any per hour code. Services 96101, 96116, 96118 and 96125 report time as (a) face–to-face with the patent and (b) time spent interpreting and preparing the report.

Typically, the neuropsychological evaluation requires 4-8 hours to perform, including administration, scoring, interpretation, report writing and interpretation to the patient and/or family. If the evaluation is performed over several days, the time should be combined and reported all on the last day of service CPT code equivalents of the most common components of the neuropsychological assessment include:

1. Direct clinical observation and interview with the patient, often with caregivers or significant others who serve as sources of information that the patient may be unable to provide (e.g., spouse, parent, adult child, care staff, therapists),  6116;

2  Review of medical records and, in some cases, other relevant records (e.g., work history, educational history, criminal or social services records, etc.), 96118;
3. Completion of forms and questionnaires by the patient and significant others (not
billable);

4. Selection, administration and interpretation of neuropsychological tests, directly by the neuropsychologist (96118); or by a technician under the neuropsychologist's direct supervision (96119), or by computerized test administration (96120), or via some combination of these three approaches to test administration;


5. Integration of neuropsychological test findings, across tests, and with information from history, observation, questionnaire, and interview, by the neuropsychologist (96118);

6. Formulation of the differential diagnoses, diagnostic conclusions, prognosis, and treatment recommendations, by the neuropsychologist (96118);

7. Provision of a feedback or treatment planning conference to the patient, with significant others as needed, to explain the test procedures, results, implications, conclusions, recommendations, and follow-through as needed (96118);

8. Preparation and provision of a written report to the patient and referring health care provider, and to other treatment providers with written informed consent to release information signed by the patient (96118).

CPT code 96119 is reported for tests administration by a technician who is hired, trained, and directly supervised by a practitioner licensed by the State to provide neuropsychological testing:

During testing, the qualified health professional frequently checks with the technician to monitor the patient’s performance and make any necessary modifications to the test battery or assessment plan. When all tests have been administered, the qualified health professional meets with the patient again to answer any questions (AMA CPT Assistant, November 2006). The time spent reviewing the results of these tests and writing the report is also reported using the same CPT code 96119.

Code 96120 is reported for computer-administered neuropsychological testing, with subsequent interpretation and report of the specific tests by the physician, psychologist, or other qualified health care professional.


Covered ICD-10 CODE DESCRIPTION

F06.0 Psychotic disorder with hallucinations due to known physiological condition
F06.2 - F06.4 - Opens in a new window Psychotic disorder with delusions due to known physiological condition - Anxiety disorder due to known physiological condition
F10.14 Alcohol abuse with alcohol-induced mood disorder
F10.151 - F10.180 - Opens in a new window Alcohol abuse with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder with hallucinations - Alcohol abuse with alcohol-induced anxiety disorder
F10.188 Alcohol abuse with other alcohol-induced disorder
F10.20 Alcohol dependence, uncomplicated
F10.24 Alcohol dependence with alcohol-induced mood disorder
F10.251 - F10.259 - Opens in a new window Alcohol dependence with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder with hallucinations - Alcohol dependence with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F10.280 Alcohol dependence with alcohol-induced anxiety disorder
F10.288 Alcohol dependence with other alcohol-induced disorder
F10.951 - F10.959 - Opens in a new window Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder with hallucinations - Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F10.980 Alcohol use, unspecified with alcohol-induced anxiety disorder
F10.988 Alcohol use, unspecified with other alcohol-induced disorder
F11.14 - F11.159 - Opens in a new window Opioid abuse with opioid-induced mood disorder - Opioid abuse with opioid-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F11.188 Opioid abuse with other opioid-induced disorder
F11.20 Opioid dependence, uncomplicated
F11.222 Opioid dependence with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F11.24 - F11.259 - Opens in a new window Opioid dependence with opioid-induced mood disorder - Opioid dependence with opioid-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F11.288 Opioid dependence with other opioid-induced disorder
F11.922 Opioid use, unspecified with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F11.94 - F11.959 - Opens in a new window Opioid use, unspecified with opioid-induced mood disorder - Opioid use, unspecified with opioid-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F11.988 Opioid use, unspecified with other opioid-induced disorder
F12.122 Cannabis abuse with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F12.150 - F12.188 - Opens in a new window Cannabis abuse with psychotic disorder with delusions - Cannabis abuse with other cannabis-induced disorder
F12.222 Cannabis dependence with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F12.250 - F12.288 - Opens in a new window Cannabis dependence with psychotic disorder with delusions - Cannabis dependence with other cannabis-induced disorder
F12.922 Cannabis use, unspecified with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F12.950 - F12.988 - Opens in a new window Cannabis use, unspecified with psychotic disorder with delusions - Cannabis use, unspecified with other cannabis-induced disorder
F13.14 - F13.180 - Opens in a new window Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic abuse with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced mood disorder - Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic abuse with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced anxiety disorder
F13.188 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic abuse with other sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced disorder
F13.20 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic dependence, uncomplicated
F13.24 - F13.259 - Opens in a new window Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic dependence with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced mood disorder - Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic dependence with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F13.280 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic dependence with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced anxiety disorder
F13.288 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic dependence with other sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced disorder
F13.94 - F13.959 - Opens in a new window Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic use, unspecified with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced mood disorder - Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic use, unspecified with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F13.980 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic use, unspecified with sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced anxiety disorder
F13.988 Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic use, unspecified with other sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic-induced disorder
F14.122 Cocaine abuse with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F14.14 - F14.180 - Opens in a new window Cocaine abuse with cocaine-induced mood disorder - Cocaine abuse with cocaine-induced anxiety disorder
F14.188 Cocaine abuse with other cocaine-induced disorder
F14.20 Cocaine dependence, uncomplicated
F14.222 Cocaine dependence with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F14.24 - F14.280 - Opens in a new window Cocaine dependence with cocaine-induced mood disorder - Cocaine dependence with cocaine-induced anxiety disorder
F14.288 Cocaine dependence with other cocaine-induced disorder
F14.922 Cocaine use, unspecified with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F14.94 - F14.980 - Opens in a new window Cocaine use, unspecified with cocaine-induced mood disorder - Cocaine use, unspecified with cocaine-induced anxiety disorder
F14.988 Cocaine use, unspecified with other cocaine-induced disorder
F15.122 Other stimulant abuse with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F15.14 - F15.180 - Opens in a new window Other stimulant abuse with stimulant-induced mood disorder - Other stimulant abuse with stimulant-induced anxiety disorder
F15.188 Other stimulant abuse with other stimulant-induced disorder
F15.20 Other stimulant dependence, uncomplicated
F15.222 Other stimulant dependence with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F15.24 - F15.280 - Opens in a new window Other stimulant dependence with stimulant-induced mood disorder - Other stimulant dependence with stimulant-induced anxiety disorder
F15.288 Other stimulant dependence with other stimulant-induced disorder
F15.922 Other stimulant use, unspecified with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F15.94 - F15.980 - Opens in a new window Other stimulant use, unspecified with stimulant-induced mood disorder - Other stimulant use, unspecified with stimulant-induced anxiety disorder
F15.988 Other stimulant use, unspecified with other stimulant-induced disorder
F16.122 Hallucinogen abuse with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F16.14 - F16.188 - Opens in a new window Hallucinogen abuse with hallucinogen-induced mood disorder - Hallucinogen abuse with other hallucinogen-induced disorder
F16.24 - F16.288 - Opens in a new window Hallucinogen dependence with hallucinogen-induced mood disorder - Hallucinogen dependence with other hallucinogen-induced disorder
F16.94 - F16.988 - Opens in a new window Hallucinogen use, unspecified with hallucinogen-induced mood disorder - Hallucinogen use, unspecified with other hallucinogen-induced disorder
F18.14 - F18.159 - Opens in a new window Inhalant abuse with inhalant-induced mood disorder - Inhalant abuse with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F18.180 - F18.188 - Opens in a new window Inhalant abuse with inhalant-induced anxiety disorder - Inhalant abuse with other inhalant-induced disorder
F18.24 - F18.259 - Opens in a new window Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced mood disorder - Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F18.280 - F18.288 - Opens in a new window Inhalant dependence with inhalant-induced anxiety disorder - Inhalant dependence with other inhalant-induced disorder
F18.94 - F18.959 - Opens in a new window Inhalant use, unspecified with inhalant-induced mood disorder - Inhalant use, unspecified with inhalant-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F18.980 - F18.988 - Opens in a new window Inhalant use, unspecified with inhalant-induced anxiety disorder - Inhalant use, unspecified with other inhalant-induced disorder
F19.122 Other psychoactive substance abuse with intoxication with perceptual disturbances
F19.14 - F19.159 - Opens in a new window Other psychoactive substance abuse with psychoactive substance-induced mood disorder - Other psychoactive substance abuse with psychoactive substance-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F19.180 Other psychoactive substance abuse with psychoactive substance-induced anxiety disorder
F19.188 Other psychoactive substance abuse with other psychoactive substance-induced disorder
F19.20 Other psychoactive substance dependence, uncomplicated
F19.222 Other psychoactive substance dependence with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F19.24 - F19.259 - Opens in a new window Other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced mood disorder - Other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F19.280 Other psychoactive substance dependence with psychoactive substance-induced anxiety disorder
F19.288 Other psychoactive substance dependence with other psychoactive substance-induced disorder
F19.922 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with intoxication with perceptual disturbance
F19.94 - F19.959 - Opens in a new window Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with psychoactive substance-induced mood disorder - Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with psychoactive substance-induced psychotic disorder, unspecified
F19.980 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with psychoactive substance-induced anxiety disorder
F19.988 Other psychoactive substance use, unspecified with other psychoactive substance-induced disorder
F20.0 - F20.3 - Opens in a new window Paranoid schizophrenia - Undifferentiated schizophrenia
F20.81 Schizophreniform disorder
F20.9 Schizophrenia, unspecified
F22 - F29 - Opens in a new window Delusional disorders - Unspecified psychosis not due to a substance or known physiological condition
F30.11 - F30.3 - Opens in a new window Manic episode without psychotic symptoms, mild - Manic episode in partial remission
F30.8 Other manic episodes
F31.11 - F31.2 - Opens in a new window Bipolar disorder, current episode manic without psychotic features, mild - Bipolar disorder, current episode manic severe with psychotic features
F31.31 - F31.5 - Opens in a new window Bipolar disorder, current episode depressed, mild - Bipolar disorder, current episode depressed, severe, with psychotic features
F31.61 - F31.73 - Opens in a new window Bipolar disorder, current episode mixed, mild - Bipolar disorder, in partial remission, most recent episode manic
F31.75 Bipolar disorder, in partial remission, most recent episode depressed
F31.77 Bipolar disorder, in partial remission, most recent episode mixed
F31.81 Bipolar II disorder
F31.9 - F32.4 - Opens in a new window Bipolar disorder, unspecified - Major depressive disorder, single episode, in partial remission
F32.8 - F33.3 - Opens in a new window Other depressive episodes - Major depressive disorder, recurrent, severe with psychotic symptoms
F33.41 Major depressive disorder, recurrent, in partial remission
F43.0 Acute stress reaction
F50.00 - F50.2 - Opens in a new window Anorexia nervosa, unspecified - Bulimia nervosa
F91.1 - F91.3 - Opens in a new window Conduct disorder, childhood-onset type - Oppositional defiant disorder
F91.9 Conduct disorder, unspecified
F93.8 Other childhood emotional disorders


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